Zero Trust
What is Zero Trust

What is Zero Trust

According to the security concept of "Zero Trust," organisations should not automatically trust any entities inside or outside their perimeters. Instead, before giving access, they must authenticate anything and everything trying to connect to their systems. This concept is based on the theory that a network can no longer be trusted and that all users, gadgets, and systems must be authenticated and authorized before they can access resources.

The Zero Trust model was developed in response to the increasing complexity of modern networks, which often include a mix of on-premises systems, cloud-based services, mobile devices, and internet of things (IoT) devices. In this environment, it is difficult to maintain traditional perimeter-based security models, which rely on firewalls and other security controls to keep threats out. Instead, the Zero Trust model focuses on verifying the identity of users and devices and granting access based on the least privilege concept, which ensures that users have only the access they need to perform their jobs.

Implementing a Zero Trust model typically involves using a combination of technologies, including multi-factor authentication, access controls, and network segmentation, to ensure that only authorized users and devices can access resources. It also involves continuous monitoring and evaluating user and device activity to identify and mitigate potential threats.

What is True Zero Trust

True Zero Trust is a security approach that takes the principles of the Zero Trust model to their logical extreme, applying them not only to network access but also to all interactions within an organization's systems. This means that all interactions and transactions, regardless of whether they are between systems within an organization or between an organization and an external entity, are treated as untrusted and subject to verification and authentication.

True Zero Trust goes beyond traditional perimeter-based security models by assuming that all users, devices, and systems are potentially compromised and that all interactions should be treated as potential threats. To implement True Zero Trust, organizations must have robust identity and access management systems in place to authenticate people and equipment and manage resource access. This may involve using technologies such as multi-factor authentication, access controls, and network segmentation to ensure that only approved devices and users may access resources.

True Zero Trust also involves continuous monitoring and evaluation of user and device activity to identify and mitigate potential threats. This may involve using technologies such as intrusion detection and prevention systems, data loss prevention systems, and security information and event management systems to quickly identify and respond to potential threats in real-time.